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GBKNOX new SCHEDULE

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Achieving your Goals and Inspiring!

We are having a strong start @GBKNOX, our goal is to motivate you also inspire you to become a better person, Using BJJ as a platform for self improvement! Check this awesome video!

Brazilian Jiu jitsu most effiencient hand combat

Here are reasons of why you need learn Brazilian jiu jitsu, most efficient martial arts, proven.

Call us if you are interested in a 30 DAYS FREE of Brazilian Jiu jitsu beginners class. CALL NOW 865-690-0088

Check this video out, this is an awesome take from a Navy seal, the highly elite and very few there trained and experienced and most effective and deadly hand to hand combat known to men.

3 Benefits to Training BJJ – Outside of the Dojo

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Benefits to Training BJJ - Outside of the Dojo

We are all aware of the positive physical health benefits that come from training bjj. TV host, chef and author Anthony Bourdain (now a 4 stripe white belt in bjj) revealed in an interview that he had lost 30 lbs. in the first 9 months of his training.

In addition to fat loss are the development of strength, flexibility, core stability and cardiovascular health. Rain or shine, you can go to the academy and get a sweat going and work every muscle group in your body.

Like yoga, jiu-jitsu movements require you to utilize the full range of motion in all of your joints, on both sides of your body. As people age, the mobility of their joints is one of the first things they lose. Bjj is a key to staying young!

Less obvious are the benefits that you enjoy outside of the academy.

Here are 3 ways that the bjj lifestyle benefits you outside of the academy.

1) Problem Solving

Speaker Tai Lopez uses the words “mental 6 pack” to describe the idea of developing your mind to the same degree of sharpness as your abdominal definition.

Look at any roll in bjj class as a series of problems that you must solve. You can not spend time fretting that your guard has been passed, you must forget it and move onto the problem at hand…not getting submitted and escaping!

You develop the “mental muscle” to solve problems without getting mentally stuck on the fact that something bad has happened. Your mind develops the habit of looking for the next step, a solution-oriented mind.

This mindset is important to dealing with life’s problems off of the mat. More than one student has said that after having a 200-pound purple belt mounted on them in class, that the rest of their day is very easy by comparison.

2) Development of perseverance

Discipline and consistency. I owe these two factors all have attained in my life. Things have never happened overnight. Results have appeared as a consequence of decades long toil. It is necessary to persist.” Master Carlos Gracie Jr.

Obtaining a blue belt or a purple belt is not an overnight occurrence. From the start of your journey in bjj there will be many ups and downs. Periods of frustration and slow progress, and alternately days of tournament gold medals and effortless flow in your jiu-jitsu.

You realize that your achievements have come as an accumulation of small efforts – class by class – over a longer, sustained period of time. You must weather the storms and continue with your greater purpose in mind.

What do you do the Monday after winning the gold medal in your division in the weekend tournament? You show up to class. What do you do the Monday after a challenging week on the mats where nothing seemed to go right? You show up to class.

If this philosophy is successful in your practice of jiu-jitsu, how else might you apply it?

If you are attending school to further your education, starting a new job at the bottom of the career ladder or embarking on any new endeavor, you may take the habit of perseverance developed in bjj and apply it to those other areas of your life.

3) Positive Habits

One of my former students revealed to me privately that they had problems with alcohol. The habit of going out for drinks on the weekend had slowly increased until alcohol had started to adversely affect the other parts of their personal life and impact their health.

I encouraged him to make a commitment to show up at the gym 3 x a week for bjj. If he knew that he was responsible to show up for morning class, then he would have a powerful incentive to not have that first drink the night before.

If you are going to demand more from your body on the mat, then you need to fuel it with some of the foods that your body needs. Instead of the deep fried foods devoured after the bar, you are making a better food choice that day before class.

For the most part you will meet people in bjj class who are more oriented towards health and fitness in their lives. There is less peer pressure to hang out in bars and smoke and drink than to get out for a hike or other physical activity.

When your weekly environment and habits change, the number of positive things you do in a week compounds into a far healthier overall lifestyle. This is what we call the jiu-jitsu lifestyle!

NY OPEN results

We hope everyone is having great day, We would like to congratulate our teammate Johnathan Miller on his amazing performance at NY Open, this past weekend!

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Brazilian jiu jitsu lifestyle

We hope everything is doing a great, Jiu jitsu is not only martial arts is life style come learn and enjoy the benefits of Brazilian jiu jitsu.

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Reasons to be part of our family

We hope everyone is having a great day, We want to invite to come join an awesome self defense program while you are getting in shape and having fun come learn from World champion and train with world champions, We have several black belts instructors , Greg thompson one of our instructors, check this out , don't miss this chance 30 DAYS FREE NOW!

MMAwin came to our school

We are proud to have MMAWin came to our Martial arts school, Check this cool video about our school Learn a little bit about our awesome school, IF you want to check us out come by 30 days FREE!

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Throw back Thursday

We hope everyone is having a great day ! TBT Absolute match it was really interesting match of series but really cool match against Mike Folwer. Amazing match. Check this out.

Happy new Years!

Professor Braga wishes everyone a great start of year, lets start this strong training hard and achieving our goals

Happy 4th July

We celebrated our 4th july in the best fashion with a great training sessions!!

We had an amazing training session today @gbknox everyone working hard on 4th July! We hope everyone is having a blessed day, Erik shared his thoughts about GBKNOX check it out.

10 important reminders of important bjj etiquette.

April 9, 2015

10 important reminders of important bjj etiquette.

Every sport or subculture has its specific set of rules and etiquette. When you are first introduced to the sport and art of brazilian jiu-jitsu, people will explain to you as you go.
Not knowing some of these rules of conduct will identify you as a noob and even worse, annoy your training partners.

Here are 10 important reminders of important bjj etiquette:

Read also: 3 Tips For Your First Year of Training

1. Don’t walk on the mats in your street shoes. You transfer who-knows-what substances from the ground to the training area. This is important to prevent skin infections!

2. Cut your fingernails and toenails at the start of every week of training. I have seen people with toenails so long they could swoop down and snatch their dinner out of a lake! Don't scratch your training partners while trying to get a grip on their kimono.

3. Show up with a clean smelling kimono. Trying to drill techniques with a partner with a funky gi is really nasty. You probably need more than one kimono if you are training more than once per week. You need to allow it to dry properly in between training sessions.

4. Don't be the guy who purposely shows up late to miss warm-ups and spends an extra-long time tying his belt or taping his fingers to avoid the drills. It sets a poor example for the other students.

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5. Show that you understand the technique being taught in the class before asking all of the what if he does this? questions. It is good to be curious about the counters and recounters, but let's get the original technique correct first!

6. If you have the flu or a cold please stay off the mats, especially if there is a competition coming up. You run the risk of getting all of your teammates sick before an important event.

7. Don't talk in the background when the instructor is teaching a technique. This is not the time for that hilarious one liner that just popped into your head. This is time to pay attention and allow everyone to focus on what the instructor is teaching.

8. Neither be a super stiff or a wet noodle when your partner is drilling the technique. You can drill with resistance after you have learned the basics of the move. How is it helpful if you are resisting your partner the first time they are attempting a move? Or just as bad, just flopping over limp when they try a sweep?

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9. A big one many students have said to me: Don't go into the bathroom barefoot and then track who knows what bacteria back onto the training surface.

10. Cellphones in the training area are not appreciated. The class time is an oasis way from the rest of your worldly cares. Carrying on a full volume conversation or loud ringtones breaks the atmosphere of the academy and is disrespectful to the other students.

Read also: 4 Things To Avoid in BJJ

Roll out the bed onto the mats

Gracie Barra Knoxville just released a new video highlighting their 6am class program. They have an awesome class running for those who enjoy an early morning workout, and choose the remainder of their day to spend quality time with their families, work, and other activities. Gracie barra Knoxville’s head instructor, Samuel Braga, is a multiple time world champion, that currently teaches the 6 am morning classes, This is a great opportunity to learn the art of jiu jitsu from a world champion. Gracie Barra Knoxville wants everyones to enjoy the benefits of Jiu jitsu, tailored for everyone budget and schedule, offering no contracts and giving you the freedom to choose the best option for you.

Developing Your A Game Tips on Finding Your Strongest Positions

Developing Your -A- Game - Tips on Finding Your Strongest Positions

It doesn't take long into your study of bjj before you start to experience success with some positions or submissions. It seems that whenever you roll, you find yourself in side control or spider guard and your kimura or triangle choke is right there for you.

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Especially for competitors, it's important for them to develop and refine their strongest go-to moves for when the tension is high and the medal is at stake. Most likely your A Game will reveal itself to you early in your training. Quite simply, you will experience your earliest successes with certain moves and naturally gravitate towards them.

It is not unusual to see experienced blue belts with a purple or brown belt level of knowledge and sharpness in their best position!

Interestingly, world champions like Romulo Barral reported that the positions that they are best known for now at black belt were positions that were also their strengths at blue belt. Their preference and A Game revealed themselves very early on in their training.

Here are 3 tips on developing your own A Game:

1) Anatomy is destiny
16293195873_2c4b35bd9d_kTo a large degree, your physical attributes will determine your strongest positions. Most triangle specialists have lanky builds with long legs. Same with Darce choke specialists. If you have the legs of a Hobbit, triangle greatness is probably not in your future.

But your butterfly guard and guillotines might be very dangerous!

Look at top competitors who share the same physical type as you and observe what positions they excel at.
Some practitioners actually select a role model whose game they wish to emulate and pattern their game after that black belt.

Read also: Top Game or Bottom Game?

2) Sets and Reps
In his excellent auto biography Total Recall, Arnold Schwarzenegger writes about the key to success in all of his accomplishments whether it was building a Mr. Olympia physique, acting in movies or delivering a Governor's speech in front of thousands, the key was repetition and practice.

16911956872_0fb11070d7_zThe same is true for developing your A Game positions. If you ask any of these World Champions about their deadly spider guard or half guard sweeps they will tell stories of countless hours in the academy, drilling and experimenting with the positions.

When it comes to acquiring a high degree of skill in any endeavor, there is no substitute for mat time. You have to accrue the reps. I recall at a seminar one black belt challenging two students to complete 500 repetitions of triangles in a month of training.

One of the students asked Is the triangle tighter if I put my leg this way or that way?

The instructor responded by saying Perform 500 triangles and YOU tell ME!:
His point was clear: you will learn things by repping that you can not learn any other way.

Read also:Advanced Methods: Limit Your Training

3) Get Obsessed For a Time Period
I am a strong advocate of advanced students starting to direct their own training. Learn all of the techniques that your professor shows in regular classes. But you also must look to direct your own learning in the positions that fit your own game.

16912210521_1e00d9c03c_kConcentrate your training efforts (especially drilling and technical idea exchange with training partners) on a certain position for at least a month.

Study the DVDs, the YouTube videos, ask your professor and the advanced belts in your academy for their tips. Immerse yourself in that position for at least a month and you will dig deep into the secrets of any submission that you want in your A Game.

Read also: 6 Steps to Fix a Hole in Your Game

It doesn't take long into your study of bjj before you start to experience success with some positions or submissions. It seems that whenever you roll, you find yourself in side control or spider guard and your kimura or triangle choke is right there for you.

gb_BLOG

Especially for competitors, it's important for them to develop and refine their strongest go-to moves for when the tension is high and the medal is at stake. Most likely your A Game will reveal itself to you early in your training. Quite simply, you will experience your earliest successes with certain moves and naturally gravitate towards them.

It is not unusual to see experienced blue belts with a purple or brown belt level of knowledge and sharpness in their best position!

Interestingly, world champions like Romulo Barral reported that the positions that they are best known for now at black belt were positions that were also their strengths at blue belt. Their preference and A Game revealed themselves very early on in their training.

Here are 3 tips on developing your own A Game

1) Anatomy is destiny
16293195873_2c4b35bd9d_kTo a large degree, your physical attributes will determine your strongest positions. Most triangle specialists have lanky builds with long legs. Same with Darce choke specialists. If you have the legs of a Hobbit, triangle greatness is probably not in your future.

But your butterfly guard and guillotines might be very dangerous!

Look at top competitors who share the same physical type as you and observe what positions they excel at.
Some practitioners actually select a role model whose game they wish to emulate and pattern their game after that black belt.

Read also: Top Game or Bottom Game?

2) Sets and Reps
In his excellent auto biography Total Recall, Arnold Schwarzenegger writes about the key to success in all of his accomplishments whether it was building a Mr. Olympia physique, acting in movies or delivering a Governor's speech in front of thousands, the key was repetition and practice.

16911956872_0fb11070d7_zThe same is true for developing your A Game positions. If you ask any of these World Champions about their deadly spider guard or half guard sweeps they will tell stories of countless hours in the academy, drilling and experimenting with the positions.

When it comes to acquiring a high degree of skill in any endeavor, there is no substitute for mat time. You have to accrue the reps. I recall at a seminar one black belt challenging two students to complete 500 repetitions of triangles in a month of training.

One of the students asked Is the triangle tighter if I put my leg this way or that way?

The instructor responded by saying Perform 500 triangles and YOU tell ME!
His point was clear: you will learn things by repping that you can not learn any other way.

Read also:Advanced Methods: Limit Your Training

3) Get Obsessed For a Time Period
I am a strong advocate of advanced students starting to direct their own training. Learn all of the techniques that your professor shows in regular classes. But you also must look to direct your own learning in the positions that fit your own game.

16912210521_1e00d9c03c_kConcentrate your training efforts (especially drilling and technical idea exchange with training partners) on a certain position for at least a month.

Study the DVDs, the YouTube videos, ask your professor and the advanced belts in your academy for their tips. Immerse yourself in that position for at least a month and you will dig deep into the secrets of any submission that you want in your A Game.

Read also: 6 Steps to Fix a Hole in Your Game

Reasons that anyone can still catch up with BJJ

I was having coffee with a buddy of mine that I have been trying to get into BJJ for quite a long time now. It seems that he needs BJJ. I also think that he is a perfect candidate to be a buddy in my own journey of BJJ awesomeness. Aside from his well-built physique, he is also one of those guys that enjoys active activities. But here’s the catch – he thinks that he is too old for BJJ. Yes. He would drop the bomb on me and say, “My friend, I am just too old for BJJ.”

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My friend in his 50’s would gladly just dismiss the idea. He knows I am advocate of BJJ. Getting a negative response would mean a look of dismay and disbelief on my part and a rather stark comment on why he should give Jiu-Jitsu a try. I was starting to think he really is too old for the art, or he is just playing lazy. I refuse to accept the latter.

Will age matter in BJJ?

That night, it got me thinking. Did he just have a self-defeating attitude about martial arts, or was he just being practical about the art of BJJ and how he feels that he will not get far with all the belt ranking system mumbo-jumbo and what-not?

1521755_10153725473995710_1367124108_nWill age matter in BJJ? I would have to say yes and no. I am being realistic so to speak. It will depend on how far you want to take the sport. Should you want to take it to the competitive level, then I would say starting on your 50’s may be a bit too late. Let’s be realistic in this sense. It depends on how far and how serious you want BJJ to be. Either go amateur or pro. Or be a fan, or be someone who dabbles on it. I believe that every budding athlete will have their own set of motivating factors. These motivating factors eventually push anyone into the direction that they need to be. Or at least feel.

BJJ discriminates against no one. This is what I would believe, having interviewed a countless number of people who got involved in Jiu-Jitsu later in their lives. I have seen people in their 40’s still in their white belts. I have seen disabled, the old, the handicapped etc.

Your Motivation

1606854_10153725475220710_57346532_nI always say that my motivation is my north star. A guide of sorts. It is your bearing. What motivates you to act is the core reason for anyone who would want to get into BJJ. What is your “why” in BJJ in the first place? Why pursue? Why continue? Why spend hours sweating it out instead of just lifting weights in the gym? What is your motivation to begin with?

In conclusion, as an ambassador of the art of Jiu-jitsu, I refuse to give up on my friend. I believe that he has the right reason to not get into it, but also, I think that he can also find the reasons to get involved. After all, Jiu-Jitsu recognizes no age.

Nilo Valle Chinilla